Monday, January 5, 2009

Stapler of the Week Archive- Arrow 210

Arrow 210 green and chrome finish

The Arrow 210 was introduced to me last fall by a fellow stapler enthusiast but I hadn't come across an example until recently. The 210 was most likely designed and manufactured in good old Brooklyn, NY and has a few really interesting features that sets it apart from other desktop models. The most interesting has to be the anvil plate which is triangular in shape and offers not just two but three staple settings: staple, pin and temporary staple. Staples load from the rear, the top opens with the release seen on the side and to top it all off, instead of simply hinging open for tacking, the entire top comes off. Another notable feature of this 210 is the area on top of the stapler holds a plastic plaque which could be engraved with your company name. On the whole it is quite a nice desktop stapler.

Excerpt from The Stapler of the Week, January 5, 2009.

14 comments:

Bruce said...

Wow I thought we were geeks when we did a cross reference for Staples to Staplers, but this is an extreme for Staplers - I like it - Great blog about the history of Staplers and a segment of the Office Product Industry. I hope you enjoy some additional traffic from us about Staplers in our blog post.

serns said...

Is the rotating anvil on the Arrow the same 3 options as on the El Casco M1-CA? I only have the Arrow.

abel said...

I'm not normally a stapler enthusiast, but I was lucky enough to find this stapler for $10 at an antique store in Riverside, California. It works great, loads a bunch of staples and is in really good condition. The Plastic on top just says Arrow 210. This will definately replace my swingline currently on my desk at work.

abel said...

I just found this stapler in grey finish complete with box at an antique store in Riverside, Ca for $10. this will definitely be replacing my Swingline currently on my desktop at work. It fits a ridiculous amount of staples up to 210, is very heavy (a little over 2 pounds, and is in really good condition.

Ryck said...

I have the Arrow 210. I think I "borrowed" it from my dad's office when I was a kid - and has been in my possession ever since. We're looking at close to 45 years.

It is dull green. The chrome has lost its luster. Heavy - obviously formed from thick sheets of metal. And built like it could keep working even if run over by a truck.

Loads from the rear. When you remove the rear staple latch I'm impressed that the spring is still very strong even with all these years of compression on it. I think if you wanted to you could let mechanism pop out of the stapler and fly across the room! Thankfully, they included a safety catch at the end of the travel to prevent such a thing from happening. How clever!

I always wondered about the triangle anvil. Obviously each setting was made for a purpose. I remember as a kid playing with each setting making stapler binds using all three.

Now after all these years I finally decided to cure my curiosity and find out what each of the staple options were for. That's how I discovered this site.

I'm truly amazed at the quality and workmanship of this stapler. A sample of good old American quality that we'll probably never see again. It is so old but so still useful. I have no doubt it will keep working for many generations for as long as staple refills are still being made.

Anonymous said...

I picked up an Arrow 210 about 15 years ago for $1 at an estate sale. It's a fine a stapler as has ever been made, and far superior to anything produced in the past 30 years!

Acidbrat said...

My wife found this at a Goodwill for $1. I was going to look up videos on repair techniques and found this article along with several others. I also noticed the triangle anvil, still curious about the midrange option.. Did not expect to find a blog about it. Amazing!

Jeff said...

I just picked one up today at Goodwill for $1.49. I found it while looking for Christmas light bulbs. It was as if someone hid it under all of the Christmas stuff. The person who priced it only saw a stapler, while I saw a work of art, a thing of beauty.

I'm still admiring it as I write: Its stylish clean lines; its thick chrome; its heavy duty extra thick rubber pads.

It's an amazing piece of engineering. It's built like it was made to go to war! No resources were spared in its construction. Not earth friendly I guess...or is it? It will last almost forever! It could be used as a weapon if necessary. This will definitely be replacing my wimpy Swingline.

Thank you that there are people like me out there.

Anonymous said...

I am amazed; I would have never guessed that there is blog on Stapler.

For the non-initiated, what staple size does this Arrow 210 use?

Anonymous said...

It uses standard 1/2" staples. I ran out of staples and tried to refill by opening the top.. they didn't fit.. I finally figured out that you refill from the back, see silver button "push down and out', slide in the new staples and replace the plunger. Wha La.

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Anonymous said...

Apr 2013 -- Just bought this at a yard sale for a buck. Can anyone educate me on the three staple types--I know the standard one, but what are the other two used for?

Anonymous said...

I'm grateful for this site; I couldn't figure out how to load staples into mine, and found out here- thanks!

Rick said...

The staples on mine dont move forward unless I bang the stapler on the floor or deal. It dosen't seem to be missing any internal parts. Do you think it needs to be oiled? Such as WD-40? My 210 was manufactured in Saddle Brooke, NJ for the stapler enthusiasts who are curious.